Common Crossword Clues Starting with C

Face cards Jack, Queen, and King are all worth ten. Most medium-strength hands should be surrendered against a dealer Ace if the hole card has not been checked. It is attractive although not necessarily wise for the player to insure against the possibility of a dealer blackjack by making a maximum "insurance" bet, in which case the "insurance proceeds" will make up for the concomitant loss on the original bet. If the dealer does have a blackjack, then all wagers except insurance will lose, unless the player also has a blackjack, which will result in a push. A non-controlling player of a blackjack hand is usually permitted to place a side bet regardless of whether the controlling player does so. If the dealer goes over 21 points, then any player who didn't already bust will win.

Wizard's Simple Strategy

House Edge

If you want to learn a strategy that is correct all the time you should use the appropriate basic strategy for the set of rules you are playing. Here are some comments of clarification. A "hard" hand is one that either has no aces, or has aces that are forced to count as point, lest the hand bust. A "soft" hand is one with at least one ace, which may still count as one or eleven points. With a hard 10 or 11, double if you have more points than the dealer, treating a dealer ace as 11 points.

Specifically, double with 10 against a 2 to 9, and with 11 against 2 to If the strategy says to double, but you have three or more cards, or table rules don't allow soft doubling, then hit, except stand with a soft If the strategy says to surrender 16 vs. If the strategy says to "not split," then treat the hand has a hard total of 8, 10, or 20, according to the pair in question.

A reader named Jeff provided another table of my simple strategy, with exceptions in small print. Details about the Wizard's Simple Strategy can be found in my Blackjack appendix See my Blackjack House Edge Calculator to determine the house edge under 6, possible rule combinations.

Following is a list of some common rule variations and the effect on the player's expected return compared to standard U.

Rule Variations Rule Effect Single deck 0. Beware Short Pays on a Blackjack More and more tables are showing up that pay less than the full 3 to 2 on a blackjack. Most of these tables pay 6 to 5, but some even money and 7 to 5 tables are known to exist. In my opinion, only games that pay 3 to 2 deserve to be called "blackjack," the rest fall under "21" games, including Super Fun 21 and Spanish Regardless of the other rules, you should demand nothing less than 3 to 2 blackjack.

You should always check the felt to be sure, and if the felt doesn't say, look for a sign. If nothing says the win on a blackjack, then ask.

Three popular bad strategies encountered at the blackjack table are: All three are very bad strategies. Following are my specific comments on each of them, including the house edge under Atlantic City rules dealer stands on soft 17, split up to 4 hands, double after split, double any two cards of 0.

For my analysis of this strategy I assumed the player would never hit a hard 12 or more. All other decisions were according to correct basic strategy. This "never bust" strategy results in a house edge of 3.

For my analysis of this strategy I assumed the player would always hit 16 or less and stand on17 or more, including a soft The player never doubled or split, since the dealer is not allowed to do so. This "mimic the dealer" strategy results in a house edge of 5.

Assume a ten in the hole: For this strategy I first figured out the optimal basic strategy under this assumption. If the dealer had an ace up, then I reverted to proper basic strategy, because the dealer would have peeked for blackjack, making a 10 impossible. This "assume a ten" strategy results in a house edge of Wizard of Odds uses cookies, this enables us to provide you with a personalised experience.

More Info Got It! Enter your email address below to subscribe to our weekly newsletter along with other special announcements from The Wizard of Odds! The Wizard of Odds. Total dependent expected return table for an infinite deck 2a: Probabilities of dealer blackjack after peek 2b: Probabilities of dealer blackjack before peek 3a: Exceptions to single-deck S17 basic strategy 3b: Exceptions to double-deck S17 basic strategy 3c: Exceptions to single-deck H17 basic strategy 4: Blackjack standard deviation details 5: Infinite deck expected return by player hand and dealer upcard 6: Fine points of when to surrender 7: Effect of card removal 8: Analysis of blackjack side bets 9: Composition-dependent expected returns for 1 to 8 decks Continuous shuffling machine vs.

Value and strategy for and bonuses Risk of ruin statistics Probabilities in the first four cards Value of each initial player card House edge using total-dependent vs. Basic strategy when dealer exposes both cards Please note that you can easily win or lose much more than the "typical" amount in one session or multiple sessions. Risk only what you can afford.

The following table compares the simplified strategies with the perfect basic strategy. The amount is shown as a sum of two figures: Please note that this is a long-term average , not the likely result of session! House edge means the percentage of your bet that you can expect to lose in the long run while using the strategy.

This is expressed as a percentage of your original bets, not counting additional money wagered on split hands and double-downs. See Blackjack House Edge video. The figures in the table are based on typical Las Vegas playing rules: The actual house edge varies with the playing rules in effect.

Navigation menu