2006 World Series of Poker

Hot wife in bachelor party. Now with waves of illegal migrants coming ashore, he is recruited to give them emergency medical care. You live now in Austin, Texas. Excelent job with the 'Tyrant of Hywunz', Fritz. Tell us a little about Anthony. Anyone care to comment?

Contributor Archives

Navigation menu

Harry was eventually ejected from the tournament and was later refunded his money. However, by the time he showed up David Singer had won his table after blinding off Negreanu's stack. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Archived from the original on September 27, Retrieved 1 August Retrieved May 13, Retrieved 31 July Archived from the original on October 17, Retrieved November 21, Retrieved October 18, Retrieved July 31, Hellmuth knocked out of WSOP".

Retrieved November 30, Retrieved 21 August Archived from the original on October 19, Retrieved July 29, Archived from the original on November 3, Retrieved June 30, Archived from the original on June 2, Retrieved July 24, Retrieved May 9, Archived from the original on November 18, Interview with Harry Demetriou". Thus, the shifts of governments and citing of articles in the Italian constitution did not directly touch me; though fascinating, I found the maneuvering.

On the streets of Milan everyone seemed friendly, affluent, and stylish. One would not guess from the historic center of Milan that the nation nears financial crisis. Everyone strolls about with shopping bags brimming with purchases. In central Milan I saw few panhandlers. Is this the work of a vigilant Carabinieri?

Heavily armed security seem ubiquitous although no one seems disturbed by their presence; rather, perhaps they are assured. Farther out from the center I saw young people who seemed to be homeless or jobless migrants — or could this impression have been the result of a prejudicial lens of my own? Near my hotel I saw one line of graffiti and only this one line that read: The small Risorgimento Museum on the picturesque Via Borgonuovo emphasizes the central role Milan had in the unification of Italy.

For example, the museum extensively describes the Five Days revolt against Austrian rulers in March The south appears neither criticized nor slighted here. The reputation of the Italian fiction writer Giovanni Verga rests on the work he set in his native Sicily. But Verga lived much of his life in Milan and often set his writing in this bustling northern capital. At least they do so for now, but perhaps not for much longer. Cases of demonic possession are on the rise.

The same goes for Spain and many countries in Latin America. More people are coming forward with claims that the devil or demons are taking over their bodies.

The demand for Catholic intervention is high. So much so that the Vatican convenes a week long course each year to train priests to identify and cure demonic possessions. This workshop was first offered in and since then the number of priests in attendance have doubled to The model is Father Gabriele Amorth. He was a pioneer in the field of exorcism and a champion fighter against the devil. Father Amorth was the official exorcist of the diocese of Rome from until his death in As the foremost expert on demonic possession, he was often newsworthy.

He said whole groups, even countries could be possessed. Never mind the headlines, Father Amorth was no charlatan. The practice of exorcism has its rules and regulations. In , he along with five other priests founded the International Association of Exorcists.

The organization based in Rome retains a mission to review cases of demonic possession and share information on how best to combat the devil. A set of principles remain in place. An exorcism is the last resort. Only when a person is uncured after examination and treatment by licensed physicians and psychologists can she be seen by an exorcist.

Often, it was Father Amorth who was called upon to expel demonic spirits. Before he died in , he claimed to have performed over , exorcisms. The film recounts the work of Father Amorth and shows the first ever authorized account of him performing an exorcism.

The film comes to us from the man who is rightly credited, along with William Peter Blatty, for advancing the concept of demonic possession throughout the world. He is a lead member of a generation of directors that came of age in the s such as Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and Steven Spielberg.

Friedkin followed that success with another. It came with tight frames, handheld shots and, as always, a fast pace. The film was bold and provocative but not a hit. That is until now…. He gives us a riveting documentary for a new generation to savor his unique style.

It is all over again. The film is horrifying, disturbing and controversial. The belief in God is confronted head-on. It is a stark and mesmerizing exploration of terror and faith. The viewer is not the same after seeing this film.

Friedkin said that he is at his best when he approaches a film as a journalist. He shows us the action. He conveys the subjects as they are. We are left to decide. Do we believe or not? The film came about by chance and circumstance. Friedkin had been directing opera in Italy in recent years and was given the Puccini Prize in Lucca. He was enticed by the beautiful walled city and home of Giacomo Puccini.

From there, he visited the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Italy had cast her spell. He wanted to see more. He thought his friend, Andrea Monda, a religious scholar, could get him in to meet Pope Francis, but that was not possible. The pope was on travel. Was there anyone else he wanted to meet? Father Amorth, he said. And if possible, could he observe an exorcism.

And if possible, could he film it. This was a first. Exorcisms are intensely private. Only family of the person possessed and selected priests can attend. Father Amorth, however, knew Friedkin from his work in cinema.

As a teenager, he became a partisan fighter when Mussolini returned from exile and established the Salo Republic. Gabriele fought beside socialists, communists, and anarchists. Yet, he came out of the conflict with the hope of stabilizing Italy.

In , he was ordained a priest and joined the Society of Saint Paul, a religious institute founded by Father James Alberione in Alba, with a goal of spreading the Gospel through modern communication. In , he began an apprenticeship in exorcism under Father Candido Amantini.

After Father Amantini died in , Father Amorth became the official exorcist of the diocese of Rome. It is the first day of May and his birthday. Old and frail, the cleric is set to face his arch enemy Lucifer. The subject for dispossession is an Italian woman in her early 40s who goes by the name Cristina. She is an architect. She has a boyfriend. Yet, she claims the devil is inside her. He pushes her to do things against her will. We see her sitting on a chair covered in a red sheet.

Her family is there with her. She is held down by several men. Father Amorth initiates the Roman Ritual of He holds the crucifix. He calls for the intercession of saints. He leads the participants in prayer. Friedkin was the lone filmmaker in the room. He records a fight on a simple handheld video camera. It is the devil versus Father Amorth. It is an evil parasite against the power of Christ. Cristina struggles to be released.

She tries to overpower the men holding her down. She then screams in anger. He visits psychiatrists at Columbia University in New York. The film sets up the never-ending debate between the Old World and New. Ideas and beliefs collide. UCLA surgeons surmise a malfunction in the temporal lobe.

However, they are open to other causes and treatments outside the practice of medicine. There soon appears on screen a digital map of the brain.

Demonic possession might be a delusion resulting from a tumor. The team of psychiatrists at Columbia University are more confident in their diagnosis. Although open to other causes and effects, the rituals of faith may have overwhelmed Cristina. The intercession of saints. The signs of the cross. The use of Holy Water. Maybe she has fallen prey to group think and the pressures of mysticism. He is smart, calm and articulate.

He begins with equivocation about demonic possession and the need for exorcism. Yet, as the interview progresses, he makes a starling revelation. He admits to being unqualified to perform an exorcism.

He does not have the acumen to take on the devil. He lacks the level of spirituality as endowed by Father Amorth. The raw close ups. The tight shots and intimate framing. The unrehearsed comments by experts. This is the kind of documentary we we grew up on. He remains a master of confrontation. He holds nothing back. They come armed with Scripture. They come endowed with the Cardinal virtue of fortitude. They come to do battle.

In either of them, the devil has met his match. It was a religious work, they said; a story of faith in the face of evil. They come as either part of the story or as symbolic images to underscore a message of faith.

What follows are the churches and historical sites in Italy that make up key scenes in the film. The documentary shows Catholic pilgrims from all over the world who ascend the stairs on their knees in acts of devotion.

These stairs were once inside the palace of Pontius Pilate in Jerusalem. They were removed and transported to Rome in the 4th century at the request of Saint Helena, mother of the Emperor Constantine. It are these stairs that Jesus Christ climbed to be seen and sentenced to death by Pilate. The subject was a woman who went by the alias Cristina. Friedkin said that Father Amorth was the most holy man he ever met. Friedkin went there to meet Cristina after Father Amorth died.

The setting is the Acropolis of Alatri and its great cyclopean wall. No mortar in the structure binds the stones together. Instead, large limestone blocks were carved according to specific measurements and tilted when stacked. The wall was erected before the time of ancient Rome and stands today after surviving many earthquakes and other destructive phenomena. The location was once the burial chamber for the Hernici tribe and then a temple for the Roman god Saturn.

The church was completed there in the 13th century with a facade added in the 19th century. Inside are relics of Saint Sixtus, one of the earliest popes who served in the first century A. Cristina did not show up to the basilica as originally planned. The grounds once hosted a temple to Venus. The church was built there in the 4th century and was renovated in the 14th century with an added bell tower and an inscription by Pope Boniface IX.

In the film, Friedkin met with Cristina, her boyfriend and her mother inside the church. She was restrained by her boyfriend who demanded the director give up the footage of her exorcism. He refused and the man threatened to kill him. Friedkin immediately left the church, got in his car and made his way quickly back to Rome. Pictured from top, Sashini Fernando, chief sustainability officer at Tropic Sri Lanka, and Paolo Bray, founder and director of Friend of the Sea; the extraction of eggs from tuna and a lab worker at Tropic Sri Lanka Friend of the Sea FOS is an organization based in Milan, Italy that has devised an international certification scheme for products from sustainable fisheries and aquaculture.

Audits are based on the best up-to-date data and run by accredited independent certification bodies. FOS also supports projects of preservation and protection of the environment and marine habitats. Moreover, it is constantly engaged in awareness campaigns to make more and more people conscious of the importance of consuming only certified sustainable seafood. The initiative aims to improve recruitment rates through assisted reproductive technology, thereby allowing a second generation of yellowfin tuna to return back to the ocean.

In , the Japanese government started a reproduction project of Bluefin tuna to support the increasing demand of sashimi. What differs is that assisted reproductive technology is applied to farming due to geo-morphological constraints, while in the case of Sri Lanka the same technique is conducted out of sea making of FCP SEA a pioneering project. To learn more about Friend of the Sea, log on to their web site at http: It is an extraordinary new documentary film by Marco Proserpio, a tireless Italian filmmaker from Milan.

Graffiti dates back to the time of antiquity. Some of its earliest examples can be seen in Italy today on the walls of buildings in Pompeii or on the walls inside the catacombs of Rome. It usually comes by way of reckless spray paint.

It is an assault upon the walls of public works or commercial buildings. It is usually nothing more than the scrawl of gang identification; a warning sign of embellished fonts, ugly and of no significance to anyone except those engaged in turf warfare.

At times, however, graffiti can be art. An artist may actually draw on a wall something definable and with a compelling message. Such is the artist known as Banksy. He is a fearless and creative graffiti artist. His stenciled black and white works first appeared on walls throughout England. In , Banksy was in Bethlehem, the birthplace of Jesus Christ, which is now part of Palestinian territory and under the watchful eye of the Israeli army and intelligence agencies.

He had been invited there, along with a select group of artists, to paint on the wall that now divides Palestine and Israel. From to , scores of young men walked from Palestinian into Israeli territory. Inside Israeli restaurants, shopping malls and bus depots, they detonated homemade explosives to kill themselves, along with hundreds of Israeli women, children and the elderly.

The wall was erected to stop the carnage and from all accounts did just that. Banksy was the most famous of artists who painted in Bethlehem. One of his paintings showed an Israeli soldier checking the identification papers of a donkey. The message was obvious: The paranoia of a police state extends to the most innocent and innocuous of beings. Yet, many Palestinians were offended. They saw the painting as a putdown. Proserpio is that rare filmmaker who seeks all sides to an issue.

The film goes from exploring artistic messages of Palestinian liberation to the unchecked avarice of the art world. A taxi driver and body builder named Walid saw the artwork and had the idea to remove and sell it. He notified Mike Cannavanti, a Greek entrepreneur in Bethlehem, who hired a contractor to chisel out the piece that contained the painting. He advertised it on Ebay. An art collector in Denmark bought the concrete slab work of art and then auctioned it in New York, Los Angeles, and London.

The asking price was in the hundreds of thousands. The identification of Banksy is not known. The same goes for many other graffiti artists. Most are wanted by the police for defacing public and private property.

Their lack of identity puts them at a severe disadvantage when it comes to selling their art. As the film documents, there is a new movement in Italy to remove graffiti artwork and sell them to museums and collectors. We see a college professor in Bologna mix a liquid chemical to cover graffiti and peel it away after drying.

The painting is then transferred to a canvas or makeshift wall inside an art gallery. What was once outlawed street art now goes for sale with asking prices in the hundreds of thousand of dollars. Graffiti artists are excluded in the share of profits from the sale. They see no income from their work.

Such is their fate. The walls of buildings do not belong to them. They have no copyright. They have no say in what happens.

What is especially intriguing is the Americanization of much of the world. We see Palestinian youths expressing themselves through rap music. We see them dressed in long flannel jackets, donning shoulder length hair or straggly beards. They speak English in an American dialect. They look as though they just came from the campuses of Berkeley.

Although Proserpio is rooting for graffiti artists, he is honest enough to show the flaws in this art movement. Graffiti consists of contradiction. Street art is now a commodity. It is obtained by the rich to display in their living rooms. Even those who were the first to see graffiti as valid art, such as Paolo Buggiani, an avant-garde performance artist in Rome, have now absconded whole works from the streets for sale to private collectors.

It is to be seen by all who cherish art, politics and the way of the world, even if at times that world is headed in the wrong direction. Tell us about your family background? Where was your family from in Italy?

My parents immigrated to Canada in from Nicastro, Calabria, Italy. I was born in Toronto, as was my sister. Then in , my dad decided to go back to Italy to live. I was just out of college, and it was frowned upon for young Italian women to live on their own in those days, so I followed my parents and my sister to move to Italy. We lived in northern Italy, around the south part of Lake Garda, for 17 years.

My sister and I both married local Italian men. I had 3 children, and my sister had two. All five of our children were born in Desenzano Del Garda, province of Brescia.

When my father died in , we began to make plans to return to Canada. In , both our families, along with my mother, returned to Canada, near Toronto. We were thrilled to be back! Unfortunately, my husband did not fit at all well in Canada, and we divorced in He immediately moved back to Italy. I remarried, this time to a police officer in central Florida and moved there to be with him.

I still live there. I still have a very large extended family in Italy and Canada. My two sons live in Canada and as well as my sister and her husband and children. My husband and I will be traveling to Italy this summer, and we are very excited to go!

What inspired you to write this book? At one point in my life, I was like Giuliana: I had multiple online friends and most of them were men. I was also going through somewhat of a mid-life crisis which was hardened by my ex-husband wanting to return to Italy. However, as I wrote, the plot became quite spicy and convoluted, but at the same time, quite interesting. However, I would not call it autobiographical.

How are you alike or different than the main character Giuliana? I am very much like Giuliana. But as the book evolved, so did I, and Giuliana and I went our separate ways. Although Giuliana is Italian, she has been full immersed in the way of Canada or America.

She works hard but also plays hard. What are your future novels or projects? Here is the link: Lorenzo, tell us about your background. Where is your family from in Italy? I am a first generation Italian American, born in Boston. My family is from the Campania region of Italy — my father is from Avellino and my mother is from Benevento.

I continue to visit Italy every year to see close friends or to discover something new. Your book describes the streets, piazzas, cafes and nightclubs of the Eternal City. The book is your tribute to Rome. Tell us why you love this city so much. I had just left my job and moved to Italy to figure out my next chapter in life. I chose to be in Rome because I never really knew Rome. Well, of course I was familiar with the city — visiting the popular sights on many occasions — but I never really got to know her well.

So I wanted to incorporate the city into my story, as a tribute to my affection for its beauty. From the outset, the similarities between you, the author, and Alex are many. Is Alex your alter ego or your antithesis? Alex does have a lot of me in him, but he is not me.

True, I can be and was a fool in love many times, but to the extent of Alex, I hope not. I did give Alex a similar job and purpose for being in Rome, but his story is not my story. Your view is far different than the religious and classical sense we often apply to the city.

Yes, and I thank you for pointing this out. Those of us who have travelled to Rome or read about Rome, or see it on TV, have been introduced to the classic sights — the Colosseum, the Vatican, La Fontana di Trevi. The book makes the reader see a different side to the city that is modern, thriving and continues to be influential. Your character Alex leaves America for Italy. Perhaps a temporary adventure… but then again maybe not. We see a lot of young people today, like Alex, wishing to live and work overseas.

Why the attraction to leave America for Italy or elsewhere? The attraction is the simple glamor of being in a place that is unlike our daily and oftentimes monotonous environment. We seek an escape from a life of working, working, working; to hopefully live a decent life.

In Italy, we see how life can be fulfilling. Italians go to work too of course, but the work does not dictate their lives. They appreciate the quality of life — the food, the people, the surroundings, and the air. All of it makes Italy a desirable place to live. This is your first novel. Do you have plans for a second novel? Or some other creative work? I am trying to write a second novel. As I try to work on novel 2, I also blog about my travels — focusing on culture, food and modern life.

But, I know I do want to complete that second book. Engage an Italian lawyer who speaks your language. A lawyer can also assist you with obtaining a building survey. The City of Worcester should not have another historical church go the same route and be demolished! The Romanesque style church, located today on Mulberry Street in Worcester, was built after when funds from the Italian community were raised for its construction.

The parish has been a mainstay of Roman Catholic worship in Worcester. Besides the church, the parish contains a recreation center, owns and maintains low income apartments and hosts a number of charitable and community events. The local diocese seeks to demolish Our Lady of Mount Carmel with no church to take its place. Options still exist to save Our Lady of Mount Carmel and time is needed to address them.

Buildings age and deteriorate, as time goes by, and it takes long term maintenance planning and budgeting to restore and stabilize them. We believe preserving this historical church is possible. If the Diocese allowed the church to be listed on the historical register, grants might be available for building upgrades and enhancements. To learn more about Our Lady of Mount Carmel and the effort to save it, please log on to www. As we approach Memorial Day, our thoughts and memories surround those loved ones who have gone away from us.

We especially remember those sons and daughters who left home to fight wars and to protect our liberty and freedom. Many veterans have found peace by joining a veterans club or organization such as ours, the Italian American Veterans of Luzerne County, Post 1, in Northeast Pennsylvania. I am a member of this fine organization and served as its commander.

We were once a large group but recently we have seen a downward slop in membership and involvement. We still participate in many civic and military events. Our members are still prominent local leaders, judges, businessmen and entrepreneurs. We still provide many improvements to the local Veterans Hospital located in Wilkes-Barre. Once, there were 1, Italian soldiers detained at this military facility. Many members are growing older and passing away with no new members joining our group.

This issue is being faced by many other organizations all over the country. New tactics and methods are tried. Membership retention is our biggest problem. Let us recall that if not for the sacrifices made by our veterans, our country, our freedom and liberty would not exist. Brandon Vallorani is the founder of Vallorani Estates and Vineyards. He recently hosted the first-ever Italian festival in Dallas, Georgia, where he lives today with his wife and seven children.

Brandon has been successful in business before and after earning an MBA in business management in from Thomas More College. His Italian blood, however, pushes him forward to get more out of life than just the bottom line.

In the beginning of the book, Brandon recounts the real-life story of his great-uncle who traveled the countryside in Abruzzo. He came across a pack of wolves and a nearby tree was his only means of escape. He took refuge on its highest limb and with nothing else to do, he took out his mandolin and started playing music for the hungry wolves below. Should we lock ourselves indoors and hide?

We should pick up our mandolin and stride onward, bringing joy to our fellow travelers on earth. His great-grandfather Luigi, a veteran of the Italo-Turkish war, had immigrated to America only to return to Italy with his young son after his wife died. It took three tries for my great-grandfather to have a son who survived to carry on the Vallorani name. He never stopped trying to do more. While he did not settle in the United States to pursue the American dream for himself, he achieved it for his family by planting the seeds of success.

We reaped what Luigi sowed. It is the Italian way to success, where business and the good life are pursued with equal vigor. An especially arid part of the Southern California desert is where Joe Chiriaco, a self-taught surveyor, envisioned a gas station and small cafe along a dirt road that became Highway 60 and then Interstate 10 in California.

Land was leased to Chiriaco from a sheep rancher in and what later became Chiriaco Summit was born. Aqueducts were built through there to transport water. Patton becomes a regular customer. His troops train nearby to fight later in the African desert. The postwar years bring a new Interstate, expansion of our hydrocarbon society, changing culture and demographics of the s. All this happens as the Chiriaco family survive and strive to retain and build their family business. Midway in the book, she considers the survival ethic of the Chiriacos: Contini Gordon gives us a wealth of historical detail in a narrative of a true American family who built something to last generations.

That America, with its freedom and fair-minded spirit, allows anyone to make it if they work hard and play by the rules. The Chiriacos did just that and we are all grateful to Dr. Contini Gordon for bringing us their incredible story. The famous command of television directors - at least the first part of it - was often relegated to the ingenuity of Imero Fiorentino. Son of Italian immigrants, Fiorentino was responsible for lighting television shows and live events in a career that spanned decades.

He was a true pioneer in his field who once worked for ABC in the s when programs were broadcast live. A graduate of Carnegie-Mellon, Fiorentino created many of the lighting techniques that are commonplace today in television. There was only one occasion when he lost his cool.

I retrieved the damaged clipboard and made up my mind to keep it and to never use another…One corner is missing and it looks pretty shabby. I love that clipboard. Thus, we welcome his new book, albeit on a bittersweet note. Fiorentino died in and his surviving wife Angela made it her mission to get the book published posthumously.

Fiorentino retells a life lived to the highest levels of craftsmanship and professional acumen. This book reminds us what it takes to be the best at what one does. Rather than being criminalized for trying to save refugees and migrants who have fled horrific detention conditions and systematic human rights abuses in Libya, NGOs saving lives at seashould be supported.

This appears to mark yet another step towards the outsourcing to the Libyan Coast Guard of the patrolling of the central Mediterranean. Their callous complicity with smugglers, criminals and torturers must end and the safety and the rights of refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants must be prioritized.

Refugees and migrants intercepted by the Libyan Coast Guard are disembarked in Libya and immediately transferred to detention centres where serious human rights violations, including arbitrary detention, torture and other ill-treatment, and exploitation have been widely documented. European Governments should condition their support on ensuring that Libyan authorities bring an end to the policy of indefinite arbitrary detention of refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants, recognize UNHCR and allow it to exercise its full mandate in the country.

European governments must also provide sufficient resettlement opportunities for the refugees stranded in Libya, establish a solid monitoring of the operations of the Libyan Coast Guard and most importantly ensure people rescued at sea are not taken back to Libya until the protection of their rights can be guaranteed.

For more information, please log on to www. Top, separate casting of "Behold" infant acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum for its permanent collection in Washington, D. King for his moral courage and nobility of spirit overlooking the Kings' tomb.

Add plaques at Columbus Circle expressing negative historical interpretations and commentary about Columbus by one group or another--"absolutely not! And add to such a negative supposition the removal or attachment of negative commentary to all statues in the United States glorifying the courageous and important civil rights, political freedoms, and military service contributions of Spanish Americans whose Queen, Isabella, of Spain financed the Columbus voyages to the New World.

When will Italian-American organizations and Italian-American media throughout the United States begin a very active, positive national campaign—in all media, Entertainment, News, and Advertising, and on all university and college campuses--to educate the American public, and the world, regarding Italian-American contributions to Civil Rights and human dignity—one of many historically significant examples, US Congressman, Peter Rodino, Jr.

King and President Johnson as the President signs the bill into Law. This would help to create a long-overdue, persistent and determined national united effort among Italian-Americans, Italian-American organizations and friends to overcome negative popular media portrayals and bigoted and misinformed mainly academic historical interpretations, perspectives, and protests regarding the contributions and history of Italian Americans to the United States—from to the present day.

It is an inspiring story of how I worked for over ten years with Mrs. King to create "Behold" and, independently, raise the casting, transportation, and installation costs of the monument.

I am currently seeking opportunities to present my story to Italian-American organizations. My hope is that by learning of my efforts to sculpt the "Behold" statue that Italian-Americans will be inspired further to show our rich history in supporting Civil Rights in America.

You can find out more about Patrick Morelli by visiting his web site at www. Morelli is currently looking to collaborate with a major architect to compete for a major public memorial to Dr. King to be sited in Boston. A deadline of February 28 is set by memorial organizers. Morelli by email at morelliart aol.

Zoe Kosmidou with guests. Chef Luigi Diotauti and Dr. Chefs Luigi Diotauti and Amy Riolo. A new kind of dining has come to Washington, in which each meal is spiced lightly with some history and culture. This blending of history and culture to highlight a memorable meal is the brainchild of Dr. For some, Zoe is a new face in the city, the recent founder and president of Ancient Dinners LLC; for others, she is a world-traveler who has for many years represented Greece at its embassy in Washington, D.

Ancient Dinners is for Zoe a blending of two loves, travel and food, and each Ancient Dinner highlights a different country around the world, gastronomically with family-style food, based on ancient recipes and created with original ingredients that are indigenous to the country.

A recent gathering was the third Ancient Dinner in a series that will continue next year as well. It was held at Aperto Restaurant in Washington, D. For the select diners, it was an educationally enriching experience, in which the ancient foods of Rome were introduced by two engaging personalities, Chefs Amy Riolo, author and television personality, and Luigi Diotaiuti, proprietor of Aperto and Al Tiramisu.

In the spirit of Virgil and Apicius, two famous Roman devotees of fine food, the charming duo of Luigi and Amy lifted the evening to Olympian heights, and filled it with their intimate knowledge. Ancient Dinners began this fall to celebrate the traditions and the cultures around the world; its goal is to offer guests a cultural experience that goes beyond just food. Joe David is the author of numerous articles and six books, including Gourmet Getaways: The Brooklyn archdiocese got its way.

And the church, built by Italian immigrants over years ago, is now being demolished. One photo was taken by my son Samer last week. You can see how the church is boarded up. No doubt this is a demolition site. You can see how the roof has been removed and, thus, the interior. It is reminiscent of what happens to a building that had a bomb dropped on it. The church was near a subway stop. I visited there in Part of Brownsville or Ocean Hill neighborhood in Brooklyn.

Some refer to the area as East New York. This neighborhood was once a densely populated Italian neighborhood. About years ago, the Italian immigrants wanted a Catholic church of their own. A house of worship that conveyed their language, customs and traditions. So, they volunteered their money and labor. Many of the men who lived there were carpenters and bricklayers and had experience in construction.

They hired an Italian architect and built a beautiful church. You can see photos here from the web site devoted to Our Lady of Loreto, a web site maintained by Dominick Mondelli. The interior was beautifully designed. There is a ceiling mural. A statue of San Innocenzo at Loreto. Here is a photo of Mass at the church in You can see that it was well-attended and made up of many devoted parishioners.

In the s, Our Lady of Loreto was turned over to the Brooklyn archdiocese. And 40 years later, the archdiocese wanted to tear it down. I published a feature article on the effort of Italian Americans who once lived in the neighborhood, who attended Mass there at Our Lady of Loreto, who were baptized there, had their first communion and confirmation there; and so they organized to save the church.

And all things were offered to the archdiocese including a creative development idea that preserved the church. This was back in and and the Brooklyn archdiocese agreed to retain the church in return for demolishing the rectory next door.

And here is where one wonders about the intentions of Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio and other officials of the Brooklyn archdiocese. Did they intentionally allow Our Lady of Loreto to deteriorate so they could claim it as a danger to the community and apply for demolition?

This is what happened over the last 18 months. The fight to preserve it included petitions and donation drives. Now, you hear the news about how divided is America. Well, the activists involved came from all walks of life. In the end, however, the fight was lost. The legal appeals exhausted and the archdiocese had their way - and Our Lady of Loreto is being torn down.

You can see photos here, taken by Todd Maisel, of The Daily News, how the the murals, statuary, the decorative elements - all being beaten and destroyed. The time it took to build them, the craftsmanship, the artistry - all for nothing - destroyed. This is not the only church to face its extinction. The situation began also around and I wanted both churches to survive.

Instead, the opposite happened. An artist by the name of Jeffrey T. Peters and has now turned it into an art academy. This part of Brownsville is still knee deep in poverty and dispossession. It remains a place plagued by urban decay. People need more than just a roof over their heads. They need inspiration from art. In return for keeping the church and its interior decorations, the people there could have a place of worship. It is not unusual for Catholic churches to be converted to Baptists and other Protestant denominations.

The turning point was when the parish turned itself over to the archdiocese. The silver lining are the activists, all ethnicities and backgrounds, that tried to save Our Lady of Loreto.

We commend them for their efforts. We commend also the Italian immigrants who built this church. They came to build up the city and not tear it down - unlike the archdiocese and now even some others in local government that want to tear down statues of Columbus and others. We learn from this sad situation, that the effort to preserve our Italian heritage in New York and all over America is well worth the fight and we have to keep fighting whenever we are faced with destruction of our heritage.

Here is a list the people who fought the good fight to save Our Lady of Loreto. If I missed anyone, please let me know, as I want to include anyone and everyone who fought the good fight. We commend the following people who led the effort to preserve the church.

Here is a link to the web site devoted to Our Lady of Loreto in Brooklyn. Please log on to their web site at http: Please join us to celebrate our Italian Heritage. Charlie Unger Assemble at WABC Channel 7, Monday, October 9, Parade chairman: Time and place indicated in Parade Order Move Out: Fifth Avenue and 72nd Street, as directed by the police department Buses meeting groups should park to pick up on 75thth Streets between 5th Avenue and Madison Avenue, according to instructions by the NYC police department.

High school bands will be judged as they march Do not break formation or stop on the Red Carpet. Groups assembling East of Fifth Avenue travel North on Madison Avenue to designated street Groups assembling West of Fifth Avenue travel North on Sixth Avenue to designated street After drop-off, participant buses should proceed to East 75th Street and park according to police department instructions. All personnel riding or walking with a float will meet at the designated staging area assigned to your float.

Floats will enter line-of-march as directed by parade captains. With the threat of removing the statue of Columbus from Columbus Circle we encourage all to also join us at the laying of the Wreath for the Columbus Statute by the National Council of Columbia Associations in Civil Service on October 8, Our Ancestors in donated the statute with small donations from Italian immigrants in appreciation of being Americans.

Sunday October 8, This autumn, the Albertina Museum in Vienna is paying homage to Raphael with a major presentation of paintings and drawings that has been developed in cooperation with the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, England. You can learn more about the Albertina Museum by logging on to http: Paolo Virzi set the film in Brianza because he thought it most like Connecticut, the setting of the novel by Stephen Amidon, from , in which the film is based.

The first are the Ossolas; a middle class family with Dino, a real estate broker, played by the versatile actor Fabrizio Bentivoglio. Dino is divorced but has remarried Roberta Morelli, a child psychologist, who is played by Valeria Golino, who you may know from popular films "Rain Man" and "Hot Shots.

She is played by actress Matilde Gioli. The second family are the Bernaschis with Giovanni, played by Fabrizio Gifuni, as the patriarch. He is a manager of a successful hedge fund in Milan. In the film both Giovanni and Carla live with their teenage son Massimilano, who is played by Guglielmo Pinelli.

Friends at private school, Serena and Massimilano form the connection between the two families. While there, he is recruited by Giovanni to play in a doubles tennis match.

After the game, Dino asks Giovanni if he can invest in the hedge fund. In order to get the money, Dino presents a false business plan to a friend, a loan officer at a bank. He expects to repay the loan quickly knowing the high rate of return of the hedge fund. The film comes to us in different parts; through the eyes of three characters, Dino, Carla and Serena. It is a style the director utilizes with compelling effect. We see the same events but by different perspectives.

Serena and her friend, Luca, played by Giovanni Anselmo are involved. The respective families face the crisis differently. The question arises as to how far will a family will go to survive scandal. The suspenseful ending is one you might not expect. The actors and actresses in "Human Capital" fully capture the peculiarities, strengths and weaknesses of the characters. The most sympathetic was Carla Bernaschi, who we see, at first, living an empty life of daily shopping sprees.

Her portrayal by Bruni is both subtle and effective. We see her chauffeured in Brianza to an old theater about to be torn down. She stops and tours the structure and then volunteers to save it. From money in Giovanni's hedge fund, she purchases the building and sets up a non-profit organization to begin restoration.

Her new board of directors are writers, professors and local politicians who come across as snobs with little care to save the old theater. The restoration effort only comes undone after Giovanni's hedge fund starts losing money and they are forced to liquidate assets.

Here we see how all members of society are inherently connected to a select few of great wealth. It is Giovanni who is the film's central figure; always present in a big way; the person who controls the money and so controls the destinies of the other characters. The suggestion in the film is that Giovanni is morally corrupt. We only know snippets of what he does.

The film would have been better if it had given us more details about his operations, where and how he invested his money. Hedge funds acquired the worst of reputations after the crash. And yet we know very little about them. Most critics noted its technique and style but found the story lacking.

The reason for that might be how the rich are portrayed in the film. The trend today in America is class warfare. And any film that shows rich people in a balanced view is destined for criticism and even condemnation.

Indeed, if anyone comes across as grossly morally corrupt in this film, it would be those of the lower classes. We see the character of Luca, fort instance, living in a rundown apartment with his uncle who is selling drugs. Another main character, Dino, is obsessed with money. He sees nothing wrong in defrauding his friend at the bank.

Considering how well the rich of Brianza are portrayed in the film, one wonders why the leaders of the province had a problem with it in the first place. The film however is not a negative dissertation of greed and materialism.

Blog Archive